Why I only use conservation grade mount boards

18

JUNE, 2019

I only use two grades of mount board for framing artwork: conservation grade and archival/museum grade mount boards.

Conservation grade mount boards are made of alpha cellulose (wood pulp to you and me). Conservation mount boards are comprised of approximately 90% alpha cellulose in the high quality boards and are pH buffered so that they are acid free.

Museum grade mount boards, also known as ragmats, are made from 100% cellulose (cotton) so are naturally acid free.

I use conservation mount boards as standard even if the artwork is a poster, open production print, or something deemed to have little or no financial value.

If a piece of artwork means enough to someone to have a bespoke frame made for it, it deserves to be protected for as long as possible.

Why use only conservation mount boards?

Basic or standard mount boards are made from cellulose too, but can also contain waste materials from the manufacturing process, optical whiteners, lignin, etc. These elements can cause a mount board’s colour to fade and discolour, the board to generally lose integrity and, because it’s acidic, it can ultimately damage the artwork.

If a piece of artwork means enough to someone to have a bespoke frame made for it, it deserves to be protected for as long as possible.

When should you choose a museum grade mount board?

Conservation grade mount boards are recommended for non-original artworks, such as fine art or limited edition prints but are what I use as standard for all artwork that is to be mounted. Museum grade mount boards are recommended original or rare artworks, and for high value fine art or limited edition prints.

 

Have something you’d like framed? Pop into my workshop in Canton, Cardiff, or get in touch.